Trivium Pursuit

Archive for the 'Language Arts' Category

Words to Liven Up Your Vocabulary This Month

Thursday, May 11th, 2017

• absquatulate = abscond, to leave, especially in a hurry or under suspicious circumstances • affray = a fight or noisy disturbance in a public place • anencephalous = congenital absence of part or all of the brain • argle-bargle = a lively discussion • batrachomyomachy = (Ancient Greek βάτραχος, frog, μῦς, mouse, and μάχη, […]

The Writer’s Toolbox

Sunday, April 3rd, 2011

What’s in your toolbox? A writer’s toolbox would be incomplete without a variety of rhetorical devices. Rhetorical devices were first examined by the rhetoricians of ancient Greece. Writers and speakers have been honing these devices ever since in their search for clarity and beauty in language. Discover these tools for yourself in thirty short, enjoyable […]

Rerun of Our Most Popular Blog Post

Monday, December 20th, 2010

Letter written by dear daughter Ava, age 8 Why do you suppose this is our most popular blog post?

What do these sentences have in common?

Wednesday, July 22nd, 2009

Don’t nod. Dogma: I am God. Never odd or even. Do geese see God? Too bad I hid a boot. Rats live on no evil star. No trace; not one carton. Murder for a jar of red rum. Some men interpret nine memos. May a moody baby doom a yam? A man, a plan, a […]

Benjamin Franklin Method

Monday, April 6th, 2009

I am having a hard time finding essays that are well written for my students to “practice” the Benjamin Franklin method of reading, outlining, and rewriting from outline [page 399 of Teaching the Trivium]. Any suggestions that are easy to do today? Thanks so much. Juli There are several books of essays in the Harvard […]

Memorization Question

Thursday, March 15th, 2007

I have a question about memory work. My son just turned 3 years old, and I want to know how much new text he needs to memorize per day/week, just to give me an idea. Today he recited The Sanctus in Latin, but this he has learned a few weeks ago. Now that I am […]

How to Use Noah Webster’s Speller to Teach Spelling, Handwriting, Grammar, and Vocabulary

Friday, March 2nd, 2007

Noah Webster graduated from Yale College in 1778, at age 20, and commenced teaching in several small American schools. He came to dislike these schools due to their being overcrowded, poorly staffed, and poorly equipped. His speller (published in 1783), grammar (published in 1784), and reader (published in 1785) were a result of his dissatisfaction […]

Winston Churchill and Prepositions

Tuesday, December 5th, 2006

It is said that Winston Churchill was once corrected for ending a sentence with a preposition, to which he responded, “This is the sort of nonsense up with which I shall not put.”

Spelling and Phonics

Tuesday, August 15th, 2006

Rachel Thomson has posted a review of our Handy English Encoder Decoder.

The Translation Game

Tuesday, July 18th, 2006

Hello, fellow friends of the vernacular and illustrious lovers of logic! (Oh, I am so sorry for being so cheesy; the heat must be getting to me!) I wanted to pass this on to you; perhaps you wouldn’t mind passing it on to everyone else on the Trivium Loop. It’s one of my blog entries, […]

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