Trivium Pursuit

Thoughts for Young Men

I read the following excerpt on Doug Phillips blog.

Taken from Grace Gems

Thoughts for Young Men by J.C. Ryle (1816 – 1900)

….There are some special dangers that young men need to be warned against.

(1) One danger to young men is PRIDE.

… Pride sits in all our hearts by nature. We are born proud. Pride makes us rest content with ourselves–think we are good enough as we are–keep us from taking advice–refuse the gospel of Christ–turn every one to his own way. But pride never reigns anywhere so powerfully as in the heart of a young man.

How common is it to see young men with big heads, high-minded, and impatient of any counsel! How often they are rude and uncourteous to all around them, thinking they are not valued and honored as they deserve! How often will they not stop to listen to a hint from an older person! They think that they know everything. They are full of conceit of their own wisdom. They think elderly people, and especially their relatives, are stupid, and dull, and slow. They want no teaching or instruction themselves: they understand all things. It almost makes them angry to be spoken to. Like young horses, they cannot bear the least control. They must be independent and have their own way. They seem to think, like those whom Job mentioned, “You are the people, and wisdom will die with you” (Job 12:2). And all this is pride.

Rehoboam was such a person, who despised the counsel of the old experienced men who stood before his father, and listened to the advice of the young men of his own generation. He lived to reap the consequences of his folly. There are many like him.

The prodigal son in the parable was also such a person, who needed to have his share of the inheritance so he could set himself up in the lifestyle that he desired. He could not submit to live quietly under his father’s roof, but would go into a far country, and be his own master. Like the little child that will leave its mother’s hand and walk alone, he soon feels the sting for his folly. He became wiser when he had to eat husks with the swine. But there are many like him.

Young men, I beseech you earnestly, beware of pride. Two things are said to be very rare sights in the world–one is a young man that is humble, and the other is an old man that is content. I fear that this is only too true.

Do not be proud of your own abilities, your own strength, your own knowledge, your own appearance, your own cleverness. Do not be proud of yourself, and your endowments of any kind. It all comes from not knowing yourself and the world. The older you grow, and the more you see, the less reason you will find for being proud. Ignorance and inexperience are the pedestal of pride; once the pedestal is removed–pride will soon come down.

Remember how often Scripture sets before us the excellence of a humble spirit. How strongly we are warned “Do not think of yourself more highly than you ought” (Romans 12:3). How plainly we are told, “The man who thinks he knows something does not yet know as he ought to know!” (1 Corinthians 8:2). How strict is the command, “Clothe yourselves with humility” (Colossians 3:12). And again, “Clothe yourselves with humility” (1 Peter 5:5). This is the garment of which many seem not to have so much as a rag.

Young men, take to heart the Scriptures just quoted. Do not be too confident in your own judgment. Stop being so sure that you are always right, and others wrong. Don’t trust your own opinion, when you find it contrary to that of older men, and especially to that of your own parents. Age gives experience, and therefore deserves respect. It is a mark of Elihu’s wisdom, in the book of Job, that “Elihu had waited before speaking to Job because they were older than he” (Job 32:4). And afterwards he said, “I am young in years, and you are old; that is why I was fearful, not daring to tell you what I know. I thought, ‘Age should speak; advanced years should teach wisdom” (Job 32:6-7). Humility and silence are beautiful graces in young people. Never be ashamed of being a learner: Jesus was one at twelve years; when He was found in the temple, He was “sitting among the teachers, listening to them and asking them questions” (Luke 2:46). The wisest men would tell you they are always learners, and are humbled to find after all how little they know. The great Sir Isaac Newton used to say that he felt himself no better than a little child, who had picked up a few precious stones on the shore of the sea of knowledge.

Young men, if you would be wise, if you would be happy, remember the warning I give you–Beware of pride…..

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