Trivium Pursuit

New Video — Teaching Classical Languages at Home

December 9th, 2014

Teaching Classical Languages at Home by Harvey and Laurie Bluedorn

This seminar was given in Austin, Texas in 2004.

 

Economics for Boys and Girls

December 9th, 2014

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Here is the Foundation for Economic Education‘s founder … strongly linking economics and character development …

Economics for Boys and Girls

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Lessons for the Young Economist is the best introduction to economics for the young reader. It covers both pure economic theory and also how markets work.

 

Clichés of Socialism

December 8th, 2014

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Taken from:

Clichés of Socialism
by various authors, published in 1970 by the Foundation for Economic Education

“When a devotee of private property, free market, limited government principles states his position, he is inevitably confronted with a barrage of socialistic clichés. Failure to answer these has effectively silenced many a spokesman for freedom.

Here are suggested answers [go to web site] to some of the most persistent of the “Clichés of Socialism.” These are not the only answers or even the best possible answers, but they may help someone else develop better explanations of the ideas on liberty that are the only effective displacement for the empty promises of socialism.”

You can download the entire book here.

1. “The more complex the society, the more government control we need.”

2. “If we had no social security, many people would go hungry.”

3. “The government should do for the people what the people are unable to do for themselves.”

4. “The right to strike is conceded, but…”

5. “Too much government? Just what would you cut out?”

6. “The size of the national debt doesn’t matter because we owe it to ourselves.”

7. “Why, you’d take us back to the horse and buggy.”

8. “The free market ignores the poor.”

9. “Man is born for cooperation, not for competition.” or “The idols of the market place must yield to those of humanity.”

10. “Americans squander their incomes on themselves while public needs are neglected.”

11. “Labor unions are too powerful today, but were useful in the past.”

12. “We have learned to counteract and thus avoid any serious depression.”

13. “Human rights are more important than property rights.”

14. “Employees often lack reserves and are subject to ‘exploitation’ by capitalist employers.”

15. “Competition is fine, but not at the expense of human beings.”

16. “We’re paying for it, so we might as well get our share.”

17. “I’m a middle-of-the-roader.”

18. “Customers ought to be protected by price controls.”

19. “The welfare state is the best security against communism.”

20. “Don’t you want to do anything?”

21. “Big business and big labor require big government.”

22. “We believe in presenting both sides.”

23. “If free enterprise really works, why the Great Depression?”

24. “Federal Aid is all right if it doesn’t bring Federal control.”

25. “The United States Constitution was designed for an agrarian society.”

26. “I prefer security to freedom.”

27. “Individual workers are too weak to bargain with corporations.”

28. “Tell me, just what liberties have you lost?”

29. “Private businessmen should welcome government competition.”

30. “The government can do it cheaper because it doesn’t have to make a profit.”

31. “If government doesn’t relieve distress, who will?”

32. “We never had it so good.”

33. “We can have both guaranteed jobs and freedom of choice.”

34. “Labor is not a commodity.”

35. “The problem of production has been solved.”

36. “Business is entitled to a fair profit.”

37. “Purchasing power creates jobs.”

38. “We’d rather have surpluses than shortages.”

39. “One man’s gain is another’s loss.”

40. “Without legislation, we’d still have child labor and sweatshop conditions.”

41. “Businessmen should work for the good of others.”

42. “From each according to his abilities, to each according to his needs.”

43. “No one must profit from the misfortune of others.”

44. “A worker should be paid according to his productivity.”

45. “The Shylock! He charges all the traffic will bear!”

46. “You do believe in majority rule, don’t you?”

47. “Socialism is the wave of the future.”

48. “There ought to be a law.”

49. “The government ought to do it.”

50. “Nobody is worth a million dollars.”

51. “Tax the rich to help the poor.”

52. “Wars bring jobs and prosperity.”

53. “We must break up economic power.”

54. “Society is to blame, not I.”

55. “I’m for free enterprise — BUT!”

56. “Rent control protects tenants.”

57. “Fact-finding is a proper function of government.”

58. “Government should control prices, but not people.”

59. “REA is a fine example of private enterprise.”

60. “The way to peace is through the U.N.”

61. “General Motors is too big.”

62. “Public housing helps to reduce crime.”

63. “But everyone else is doing it.”

64. “Industrialization causes unemployment in capitalist countries.”

65. “Industrialization assures progress in undeveloped countries.”

66. “Socialism works in Sweden.”

67. “Government should guarantee freedom from want.”

68. “Equality should be enforced by law.”

69. “Government spending assures prosperity.”

70. “Capital can move; labor can’t.”

71. “Speculation should be outlawed.”

72. “Moonlighting increases unemployment.”

73. “The Government is All of Us.”

74. “Every employee is entitled to a fair wage.”

75. “Under public ownership, we, the people, own it.”

76. “What this country needs is Creative Federalism.”

 

I shall forget all the toils of my journey

December 8th, 2014

James Meikle
A Secret Survey into the State of the Soul
April 13, 1779

There is one thing which is needful, and only one thing. Henceforth let me attend to it with diligence and care, and not to make trifles such matters of concern.

If I am traveling to my Father’s house, I should attend closely to my journey, and not consume myself with anxiety about the climate, whether it it fair or foul, whether the road is good or bad, and whether I join agreeable company, or walk alone. For my Father’s house will make me completely happy, so happy that I shall forget all the toils of my journey.

Heaven will make amends for all.

 

How Can a Regular Mom…..?

December 6th, 2014

I am thrilled with the content of your book Teaching the Trivium. I have been searching for such a method of teaching and now that I have found it, I am trying to figure out how to implement it! We began homeschooling just this year and I have been diligent in reading all I can in trying to formulate our methods. I have been drawn particularly to the Charlotte Mason methods, Ambleside Online and now to your book. Our children are ages 7 and 10 and I feel we are beginning too late to incorporate all the richness you have brought forth in your text! Our son will begin Latin this coming year but so far we have only been working on root word studies with both of them. I suppose my question is….how can a regular mom, with regular demands upon her life, do so much towards teaching her children? (I am speaking mainly on learning Greek, Hebrew and/or Latin here). I am not well versed in the knowledge of foreign language and I often question the need to learn so much of same when there are so many other things to impart to our young ones. Sincerely, JA

I think you’ll find there are a lot of regular moms here, self included. Harvey and I first met in a Greek class in college in 1973 — I quickly dropped out as it was too difficult for me. Harvey has always taken over teaching the children Greek up until they were old enough to teach themselves. I did the Latin with them, although I know it was a struggle at times to keep up, what with all the other things on my plate at the time. We never tried Hebrew, except that Johannah learned the alphabet in order to write her Little Bitty Baby Learns Hebrew. So, if you are thinking that you MUST teach the children Greek, Latin, and Hebrew all at the same time with no help, then, yes, that would be overwhelming.

I suggest you pick one language, and start with that. Latin is easier than Greek, although, for us, Greek seemed more important. Perhaps you see more value in Latin and so would want to start there. Find a curriculum which is self-teaching so you can learn it along with the children without the help of an instructor. Then later, if your husband is willing to help in the language department, perhaps your family can tackle a second language. It is the rare family which will master all three languages beyond the dabbling stage. But as far as being a regular mom, I can only offer myself as an example. I have no particular aptitude in languages or logic (it took me 5 passes — 5 kids — through the Critical Thinking books to finally get it). Science and history were adventures the children and I went on together. Literature was learned on a couch — I wonder exactly HOW many hours I read aloud over those 25 years.

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New Video — Homeschooling Classical and Historical Literature

November 30th, 2014

This is a video recording of the seminar Principles for the Study of Classical and Historical Literature by Harvey and Laurie Bluedorn.

The seminar was delivered in Austin, Texas in 2004.

Living and Learning at Home

 

Review of Bless the Lord — The 103rd Psalm

November 24th, 2014

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We love reading the Bible to our children, which is one reason why we love the book, Bless the Lord: The 103rd Psalm by Johannah Bluedorn. It is a marvelously illustrated version of Psalm 103 with gorgeous full-color drawings on every page. In Bless the Lord, the 103rd Psalm is divided into short sentences or phrases, and each page is then covered with detailed drawings illustrating a family glorifying God in their daily lives. Bless The Lord is a book that makes reading and memorizing the Psalms even more meaningful because we can see on each page pictures that remind us of God’s loving care. We also love that the Psalm is in the King James Version because we feel it is the best for memorization. Bless the Lord also includes simple music arranged by Harvey Bluedorn so that you and your child can sing the Psalm for added memorization help. As a bedtime story, gift, or a memorization aid, Bless the Lord is a valuable addition to the homeschool library.

Jennifer Pepito

 

Free Homeschooling Ebook for These Five Days

November 21st, 2014

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Trivium Pursuit has made another chapter available in ebook form from their book Teaching the Trivium: Christian Homeschooling in a Classical Style by Harvey and Laurie Bluedorn.

This 48-page ebook contains Chapter Twelve: Ten Things to Do — Ages Ten Through Twelve. The chapter lays out a suggested course of study and guidelines for teaching children ages ten through twelve.

You can purchase the ebook on Amazon for $1.99, but from November 25-29 you can download the ebook for free, plus receive another Trivium Pursuit ebook. See details below.

Teaching the Trivium: Christian Homeschooling in a Classical Style is not just about classical education — it gives foundational reasons for why homeschooling should be your first choice. Some of the distinctives of Teaching the Trivium include:

    –an emphasis on reading aloud to your children

    –studying logic from ages ten through high school, rather than using it as a one or two-year supplement

    –ancient literature from a Christian perspective — is it really necessary to read Homer?

    –choices in language study, with an emphasis on Biblical Greek

    –why INFORMAL math or grammar before age ten may be a better choice

    –how to give your children the tools they need to teach themselves

    –how to homeschool in a classical style without buckling under the burden

    –a workable plan for every subject and for every age which avoids homeschool burnout — there is only so much time in the day

    –how to continue using other approaches to homeschooling within the framework of classical education

    –homeschooling is not alternative education — homeschooling was here first

Sign up for the Homeschooling with the Trivium newsletter. Newsletters contain such things as

• Freebies
• Book reviews
• Homeschooling Q & A
• read-aloud suggestions
• Tips on teaching Latin, Greek, and logic
• Contests with book-giveaways

Harvey and Laurie Bluedorn started homeschooling their children in 1980 and have given workshops on homeschooling and classical education for support groups and at conventions across the country. Their publishing company Trivium Pursuit produces books and curricula to help parents use classical education in their homeschool. The Bluedorns live in New Boston, Illinois, and can be reached by visiting their web site.

Here is the special offer we have for you:

On November 25-29 (these five days only) the new ebook will be free. In addition, if you download the ebook sometime during the five day period and write an Amazon review, we’ll send you one of the ebooks from our Trivium Pursuit catalog (in PDF format). You can choose one ebook from the following:

Vocabulary Bridges from English to Latin & Greek by Harvey Bluedorn

A Review of English Grammar for Students of Biblical Greek and Other Ancient Languages by Harvey Bluedorn

Cómo Enseñar el Trivium — Educación Cristiana en Casa en un Estilo Clásico by Harvey and Laurie Bluedorn

Ancient Literature — Significant Excerpts From the Books of Classical Authors Which You Can Use to Supplement Your History Curriculum — Volume One: Julius Caesar

Ancient Literature — Significant Excerpts From the Books of Classical Authors Which You Can Use to Supplement Your History Curriculum — Volume Two: Alexander the Great

Ancient Literature — Significant Excerpts From the Books of Classical Authors Which You Can Use to Supplement Your History Curriculum — Volume Three: Augustus, Jesus Christ, and Tiberius

Ancient Literature — Significant Excerpts From the Books of Classical Authors Which You Can Use to Supplement Your History Curriculum — Volume Four: Ancient Egypt

Ancient Literature — Significant Excerpts From the Books of Classical Authors Which You Can Use to Supplement Your History Curriculum — Volume Five: Caligula, Claudius, and Paul

Ancient Literature — Significant Excerpts from the Books of Classical Authors Which You Can Use to Supplement Your History Curriculum — Volume Six: Nero, Paul, and the Destruction of Jerusalem

Westminster and Her Sisters: A Complete Collation and Comparison of Three English Confessions of Faith by Harvey Bluedorn

Trivium Pursuit’s List of National Contests and Exams Open to Homeschoolers

After you download Ten Things to Do — Ages Ten Through Twelve and post your review, then email us (bluedorn @ triviumpursuit.com) with the name you wrote your review under and tell us which of the above ebooks you would like.

 

New Homeschooling Ebook Now Available from Trivium Pursuit

November 21st, 2014

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Trivium Pursuit has made available in ebook form a chapter from their book Teaching the Trivium: Christian Homeschooling in a Classical Style by Harvey and Laurie Bluedorn.

This 48-page ebook is Chapter Twelve: Ten Things to Do — Ages Ten Through Twelve. The chapter lays out a suggested course of study and suggestions for teaching children ages ten through twelve.

You can purchase the ebook on Amazon for $1.99.

From November 25-29 you can download the ebook for free, plus receive another Trivium Pursuit ebook. Details coming soon.

Teaching the Trivium: Christian Homeschooling in a Classical Style is not just about classical education — it gives foundational reasons for why homeschooling should be your first choice. Some of the distinctives of Teaching the Trivium include:

–an emphasis on reading aloud to your children

–studying logic from ages ten through high school, rather than using it as a one or two-year supplement

–ancient literature from a Christian perspective — is it really necessary to read Homer?

–choices in language study, with an emphasis on Biblical Greek

–why INFORMAL math or grammar before age ten may be a better choice

–how to give your children the tools they need to teach themselves

–how to homeschool in a classical style without buckling under the burden

–a workable plan for every subject and for every age which avoids homeschool burnout — there is only so much time in the day

–how to continue using other approaches to homeschooling within the framework of classical education

–homeschooling is not alternative education — homeschooling was here first

Sign up for the Homeschooling with the Trivium newsletter — each newsletter contains freebies, book reviews, Homeschooling Q & A, read-aloud suggestions, tips on teaching Latin, Greek, and logic, and contests with book-giveaways.

Harvey and Laurie Bluedorn started homeschooling their children in 1980 and have given workshops on homeschooling and classical education for support groups and at conventions across the country. Their publishing company Trivium Pursuit produces books and curricula to help parents use classical education in their homeschool. The Bluedorns live in New Boston, Illinois, and can be reached by visiting their web site.

 

Review of The Fallacy Detective

November 19th, 2014

“Mom, that was a red herring!”

My daughter blurted this out as we were watching a news show one evening. The most interesting thing about her statement was not the fact that she had learned it from our reading of The Fallacy Detective, but that it came from my ten-year-old who had only been listening in as I read the book with my older children. And, she was right! The news anchor truly was engaging in a faulty argument.

The Fallacy Detective: Thirty-Eight Lessons on How to Recognize Bad Reasoning, written by homeschooled brothers Nathaniel and Hans Bluedorn, is an engaging little book written to help young people (and adults!) learn how to recognize bad reasoning. Logical fallacies and propaganda techniques are covered, and chapters address various topics, including recognizing “red herrings,” ad hominem attacks, generalizations, and much more. The book is definitely Christian in tone, with occasional biblical references. Each short chapter covers one type of fallacy, followed by exercises that are ideal for discussion. While the book can be used independently, this is a fun book to read aloud with your children.

The Fallacy Detective is written in a humorous, readable format, with the frequent use of funny illustrations and comics like Calvin and Hobbes sprinkled throughout. Though presented in an appealing manner, the lessons are thought-provoking and definitely encourage students to think and question. For parents who were never trained in logic, it will push them as well! As a parent, I am thankful for the inclusion of an answer key for the end-of-chapter questions.

At the end of the book, there is a Fallacy Detective game students can play by crafting their own examples of fallacies. Additionally, the Bluedorns’ website has a page called The Fallacy Detective News, with examples drawn from real-life events and news stories, illustrating lessons learned from the book. With plentiful examples of bad reasoning all around in our culture, there is lots of fodder for practicing the principles learned here. This is one of my favorite middle- and high-school resources, and one I consider a ‘must-have’!

Only intelligent homeschoolers with high standards will want to purchase this book, so be sure to get yours today! (Wait, that was an example of a fallacy—“snob appeal”! I did learn something from The Fallacy Detective.

Jen McDonald

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