Trivium Pursuit

Do not try to persuade a domineering person to stop being domineering on your own

April 25th, 2015

How does the ongoing sin of others impact our physical health? by Rick Thomas

Have you ever wondered if a person’s ongoing bad behavior toward you was negatively effecting you? Is it possible that the sinfulness of others can cause diminishing health problems for the ones in harm’s way? … If my sin is affecting my health, then I can repent and be restored. If the sin of another person is affecting my health, then I am at the mercy of the other person owning and removing the sin from the relationship. In some marriages, the abusive spouse does not repent –- a situation that can leave the victim spouse vulnerable.

Read the rest of the article here.

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A recommended intensive phonics curriculum

April 21st, 2015

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I started my Blend Phonics web site back in 2007 when I began using Hazel Loring’s 1980 Reading Made Easy with Blend Phonics for First Grade with my tutoring students. Reading Made Easy with Blend Phonics for First Grade interested me for several reasons: It was free. It was very simple to teach and learn. It proved highly effective.

I feel that many phonics program are prone to failure because they are too complicated for many teachers and parents. I taught Saxon Phonics years ago, but it takes extensive training and is prone to failure because of its complexity. The same is true of Spalding and many other phonics programs. It is not that the programs are not effective in theory and even practice with extensive training, but they are prone to failure in anything but ideal situations.

I first offered Reading Made Easy with Blend Phonics for First Grade back in 2003 as a free document on my Don Potter website. That website is something of a never-ending personal journal with links to my research and free publications.

I would like for every first-grade teacher in America receive a copy of Loring’s Reading Made Easy with Blend Phonics for First Grade. I am convinced that this 25-page pamphlet could transform education in America.

I also have made available a brief introductory demonstration lesson on Blend Phonics.

Don Potter
Odessa, Texas

Living and Learning at Home

 

The thoughts make the face

April 21st, 2015

by J.R. Miller, The Face of the Master

His face was like the sun shining in all its brilliance! Revelation 1:16

We have no picture of Jesus Christ. The paintings of Him which artists have given us are only their conceptions of His appearance. None of these paintings, however noble and worthy they may be, are to be thought of as true portraits of the Master’s face.

Yet the face of Jesus Christ must have been very beautiful. It is sin that disfigures the human countenance, and there was no sin in Him. His life was spotless and pure.

They tell us that the thoughts make the face. We cannot altogether hide our inner life from men’s eyes. What goes on in the depths of our being, comes up to the surface in unmistakable indications and revealings. The faulty qualities of the heart work out in the life and betray themselves in the face.

If you are discontented, then the discontent will reveal itself in your features. If you have bitter thoughts and feelings in your heart, then the bitterness will write its hard lines on your countenance. But if you habitually think gentle thoughts, kindly thoughts, peaceful thoughts, then on your face will come gentleness, kindness, and peace. If you keep love in your heart amid all your afflictions and trials, all the irritations and harrowings of life, then your face will shine with love. There is much truth in the familiar lines:

Beautiful thoughts make a beautiful soul,
And a beautiful soul makes a beautiful face.

We know that all the thoughts of the Master were beautiful thoughts. Heaven dwelt in Him, and there was never any fleck of stain upon His soul. In a world of hate, cruelty, and injustice, His heart was always full of love. Never was an unkind thought there for a moment. Infinite holiness dwelt in Him. All the beatitudes had their home in His bosom. All the fruits of the Spirit grew to perfect ripeness in Him.

Whatever things are true,
whatever things are noble,
whatever things are just,
whatever things are pure,
whatever things are lovely,
whatever things are commendable,
if there is any virtue and
if there is anything praiseworthy–
meditate on these things! Philippians 4:8

These were the things on which Jesus thought continually. He never had . . .
a sordid thought,
an impure thought,
a trivial thought,
a selfish thought.

His mind was never disturbed by discontent, by impurity, by anxiety. His converse was always with His Father. Though walking on the earth among sinful men, He really lived in Heaven. All His feelings, desires, affections, and emotions were holy. He always did those things that were pleasing to His Father. If beautiful thoughts make a beautiful soul, then the soul of Jesus was spotlessly, divinely beautiful. And if a beautiful soul makes a beautiful face, then the face of Jesus was transcendently lovely.

Sorrow mars some faces. It need not do so. Only when affliction is not accepted in love and faith does it leave marks of disfigurement. Sorrow sweetly endured transfigures the face, giving it new beauty. Jesus was a man of sorrows, but His sorrows only made His face more radiant.

Poverty writes hard lines on some faces. Jesus was poor — He had nowhere to lay His head. But His poverty left no trace on His features except to make them gentler, kindlier, more sympathetic toward human poverty and need. His face was quiet, calm, serene, heavenly.

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J.R. Miller

 

Christian and Hopeful under the power of Giant Despair

April 20th, 2015

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The giant, therefore, drove them before him, and put them into his castle, into a very dark dungeon, nasty and stinking to the spirit of these two men.

Lover and friend hast thou put far from me, and mine acquaintance into darkness. Psalm 88:18

Here then they lay, from Wednesday morning till Saturday night, without one bit of bread, or drop of drink, or any light, or any to ask how they did. They were, therefore, here in evil case; and were far from friends and acquaintance. Now in this place CHRISTIAN had double sorrow; because ‘t was through his unadvised counsel that they were brought into this distress.

Now Giant DESPAIR had a wife, and her name was DIFFIDENCE; so when he was gone to bed, he told his wife what he had done, to wit, that he had taken a couple of prisoners, and cast them into his dungeon, for trespassing on his grounds. Then he asked her also what he had best to do further to them. So she asked him what they were; whence they came; and whither they were bound: and he told her. Then she counseled him, that when he arose in the morning he should beat them without any mercy: so when he arose, he gets him a grievous crab tree cudgel, and goes down into the dungeon to them, and there first falls to rating of them as if they were dogs, although they gave him never a word of distaste; then he falls upon them, and beats them fearfully, in such sort, that they were not able to help themselves, or to turn them upon the floor. This done, he withdraws and leaves them, there to condole their misery, and to mourn under their distress; so all that day they spent the time in nothing but sighs and bitter lamentations. The next night, she talking with her husband about them further, and understanding that they were yet alive, did advise him to counsel them to make away with themselves. So when morning was come, he goes to them in a surly manner, as before; and perceiving them to be very sore with the stripes that he had given them the day before, he told them that since they were never like to come out of that place, their only way would be, forthwith to make an end of themselves, either with knife, halter, or poison: “For why,” said he, “should you choose life, seeing it is attended with so much bitterness?” But they desired him to let them go; with that he looked ugly upon them, and rushing to them, had doubtless made an end of them himself, but that he fell into one of his fits; for he sometimes in sunshine weather fell into fits, and lost (for a time) the use of his hand; wherefore he withdrew, and left them (as before) to consider what to do. Then did the prisoners consult between themselves, whether ‘t was best to take his counsel or not: and thus they began to discourse.

Christian: “Brother,” said CHRISTIAN, “what shall we do? the life that we now live is miserable: for my part I know not whether is best — to live thus, or to die out of hand. ‘My soul chooses strangling rather than life';

So that my soul chooseth strangling, and death rather than my life. Job 7:15

and the grave is more easy for me than this dungeon. Shall we be ruled by the Giant?”

Hopeful: Indeed our present condition is dreadful, and death would be far more welcome to me than thus for ever to abide; but yet let us consider, the Lord of the country to which we are going hath said, “Thou shalt do no murder,” no, not to another man’s person. Much more, then, are we forbidden to take his counsel to kill ourselves. Besides, he that kills another can but commit murder upon his body; but for one to kill himself, is to kill body and soul at once. And, moreover, my brother, thou talkest of ease in the grave; but hast thou forgotten the hell, whither for certain the murderers go? “for no murderer hath eternal life.” And let us consider again, that all the law is not in the hand of Giant DESPAIR; others, so far as I can understand, have been taken by him as well as we, and yet have escaped out of his hand: who knows but that God who made the world may cause that Giant DESPAIR may die that, at some time or other, he may forget to lock us in? – or, but he may in a short time have another of his fits before us, and may lose the use of his limbs? And if ever that should come to pass again, for my part I am resolved to pluck up the heart of a man, and to try my utmost to get from under his hand. I was a fool that I did not try to do it before; but however, my brother, let us be patient, and endure awhile; the time may come that may give us a happy release; but let us not be our own murderers.

With these words HOPEFUL at present did moderate the mind of his brother; so they continued together (in the dark) that day, in their sad and doleful condition.

Well, towards evening, the Giant went down into the dungeon again, to see if his prisoners had taken his counsel. But when he came there, he found them alive; and truly, alive was all: for now, what for want of bread and water, and by reason of the wounds they received when he beat them, they could do little but breathe. But I say, he found them alive; at which he fell into a grievous rage, and told them that, seeing they had disobeyed his counsel, it should be worse with them than if they had never been born.

At this they trembled greatly; and I think that CHRISTIAN fell into a swoon; but coming a little to himself again, they renewed their discourse about the Giant’s counsel, and whether yet they had best to take it or not. Now CHRISTIAN again seemed to be for doing it; but HOPEFUL made his second reply, as follows:

Hopeful: “My brother,” said he, “rememberest thou not how valiant thou hast been heretofore? APOLLYON could not crush thee; nor could all that thou didst hear, or see, or feel, in the Valley of the Shadow of Death. What hardship, terror, and amazement, hast thou already gone through — and art thou now nothing but fear? Thou seest that I am in the dungeon with thee, a far weaker man by nature than thou art! Also, this Giant has wounded me as well as thee, and hath also cut off the bread and water from my mouth; and with thee I mourn without the light: but let us exercise a little more patience. Remember how thou playedst the man at Vanity Fair, and wast neither afraid of the chain nor cage, nor yet of bloody death; wherefore let us – at least to avoid the shame that becomes not a Christian to be found in – bear up with patience as well as we can.”

Now night being come again, and the Giant and his wife being in bed, she asked him concerning the prisoners; and if they had taken his counsel? To which he replied, “They are sturdy rogues; they choose rather to bear all hardship than to make away with themselves.” Then said she, “Take them into the castle yard tomorrow, and show them the bones and skulls of those that thou hast already dispatched; and make them believe, ere a week comes to an end, thou also wilt tear them in pieces, as thou hast done their fellows before them.”

So when the morning was come, the Giant went to them again, and took them into the castle yard, and showed them as his wife had bidden him. “These,” said he, “were pilgrims as you are, once, and they trespassed’ in my grounds, as you have done; and when I thought fit, I tore them in pieces; and so within ten days I will do to you: go, get you down to your den again!” And with that he beat them all the way thither. They lay, therefore, all day on Saturday in a lamentable case, as before. Now when night was come, and when Mrs. DIFFIDENCE, and her husband the Giant, were got to bed, they began to renew the discourse of their prisoners; and withal the old Giant wondered that he could neither by his blows nor counsel bring them to an end. And with that his wife replied: “I fear,” said she, “that they live in hope that some will come to relieve them; or that they have picklocks about them; by the means of which they hope to escape.” “And sayest thou so, my dear?” said the Giant; “I will therefore search them in the morning.”

Well, on Saturday, about midnight the pilgrims began to pray; and continued in prayer till almost break of day.

Now a little before it was day, good CHRISTIAN, as one half amazed, break out in this passionate speech: “What a fool,” quoth he, “am I, thus to lie in a stinking dungeon, when I may as well walk at liberty! I have a key in my bosom called Promise; that will, I am persuaded, open any lock in Doubting Castle.” Then said HOPEFUL, “That’s good news; good brother, pluck it out of thy bosom, and try.”

Then CHRISTIAN pulled it out of his bosom, and began to try at the dungeon door; whose bolt (as he turned the key) gave back, and the door flew open with ease: and CHRISTIAN and HOPEFUL both came out. Then he went to the outward door that led into the castle yard; and with his key opened that door also. After, he went to the iron gate, for that must be opened too; but that lock went exceedingly hard: yet the key did open it. Then they thrust open the gate to make their escape with speed; but that gate, as it opened, made such a creaking, that it waked Giant DESPAIR:

who, hastily rising to pursue his prisoners, felt his limbs to fail, for his fits took him again, so that he could by no means go after them. Then they went on, and came to the king’s highway again; and so were safe, because they were out of his jurisdiction.

Now when they were gone over the stile, they began to contrive with themselves what they should do at that stile, to prevent those that should come after from falling into the hands of Giant DESPAIR. So they consented to erect there a pillar, and to engrave upon the side thereof this sentence: “Over this stile is the way to Doubting Castle; which is kept by Giant DESPAIR, who despises the King of the Celestial Country, and seeks to destroy his holy pilgrims.” Many, therefore, that followed after, read what was written, and escaped the danger. This done, they sang as follows:

“Out of the way we went; and then we found
What ‘t was to tread upon forbidden ground:
And let them that come after have a care,
Lest heedlessness makes them, as we to fare;
Lest they, for trespassing, his prisoners are,
Whose castle’s ‘Doubting’ and whose name’s DESPAIR.”

Excerpt from Pilgrim’s Progress by John Bunyan

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Comparison of Greek Pronunciation Systems

April 17th, 2015


Over the years, several persons have written to us regarding the many different systems of pronunciation which can be found in various Greek grammars. On our web page, we have placed an article which is designed to answer such questions.

Some things included in this article:


    A list of resources on ancient Greek pronunciation.

    Some explanation as to why and how A Greek Alphabetarion was constructed.

    A brief historical summary of Greek dialects.

    A brief and selected history of the reconstruction of Ancient Greek pronunciation systems.
    Interesting quotes concerning Ancient Greek pronunciation systems.

    A comparison of Ancient Greek pronunciation systems from twenty grammars.
    A brief comparison of four systems of diphthong pronunciation.


Here is an interesting quote:


The value assigned … to each letter does not always reflect what is known of the ancient pronunciation, which in any case developed over time and varied from one locality to another. … [T]he need for absolute accuracy in pronunciation does not arise. … The pronunciation given … is convenient for us today, even though it is not historical. The New Testament was written in a conventional spelling which reflected the pronunciation of Greek several centuries earlier and not that current at the time of its authors. – Gavin Betts. Teach Yourself New Testament Greek. Chicago: McGraw-Hill Companies, 2004, pages 1, 3.

Harvey Bluedorn

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Let us cry, then, for special strength

April 16th, 2015

C.H. Spurgeon April 16 Evening Meditation

Exodus 17:8-13

Now Amalek came and fought with Israel in Rephidim. And Moses said to Joshua, “Choose us some men and go out, fight with Amalek. Tomorrow I will stand on the top of the hill with the rod of God in my hand.” So Joshua did as Moses said to him, and fought with Amalek. And Moses, Aaron, and Hur went up to the top of the hill. And so it was, when Moses held up his hand, that Israel prevailed; and when he let down his hand, Amalek prevailed. But Moses’ hands became heavy; so they took a stone and put it under him, and he sat on it. And Aaron and Hur supported his hands, one on one side, and the other on the other side; and his hands were steady until the going down of the sun. So Joshua defeated Amalek and his people with the edge of the sword.

So mighty was the prayer of Moses, that all depended upon it. The petitions of Moses discomfited the enemy more than the fighting of Joshua. Yet both were needed. So, in the soul’s conflict, force and fervour, decision and devotion, valour and vehemence, must join their forces, and all will be well. You must wrestle with your sin, but the major part of the wrestling must be done alone in private with God. Prayer, like Moses’, holds up the token of the covenant before the Lord. The rod was the emblem of God’s working with Moses, the symbol of God’s government in Israel. Learn, O pleading saint, to hold up the promise and the oath of God before him. The Lord cannot deny his own declarations. Hold up the rod of promise, and have what you will.

Moses grew weary, and then his friends assisted him. When at any time your prayer flags, let faith support one hand, and let holy hope uplift the other, and prayer seating itself upon the stone of Israel, the rock of our salvation, will persevere and prevail. Beware of faintness in devotion; if Moses felt it, who can escape? It is far easier to fight with sin in public, than to pray against it in private. It is remarked that Joshua never grew weary in the fighting, but Moses did grow weary in the praying; the more spiritual an exercise, the more difficult it is for flesh and blood to maintain it. Let us cry, then, for special strength, and may the Spirit of God, who helps our infirmities, as he allowed help to Moses, enable us like him to continue with our hands steady “until the going down of the sun;” till the evening of life is over; till we shall come to the rising of a better sun in the land where prayer is swallowed up in praise.

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Experience in Delaying Math

April 13th, 2015

Dear Laurie,

I wanted to give a testimonial about your book Teaching the Trivium. Last year my husband and I became very convicted about having our children in school. It was a wonderful Christian school, and I was the 3rd/4th grade language arts teacher. We decided in early January that I should stay home for the next school year and homeschool our two children. I was very reluctant. Near the end of January I had to have emergency surgery and was at home for 10 weeks! (A really big deal for an elementary teacher to miss that much school.) Anyway, I started doing some research of the Scripture and could not find one justification for me being away from home. This was a real surprise to me, because I had really felt like I was doing what God wanted me to do by teaching there. I knew that it was God’s plan for me to be home. As we started planning our curriculum, your book was one of the first I bought. It was exactly what I wanted to do and so down to earth! So, with much kicking and screaming from both our children, we all came home. It has been a blow to the budget and we are experiencing a lot of financial hardship and have given up many things, but I know that we are doing the right thing.

My daughter (9) just gave her testimony at church this week and it was absolutely beautiful. My son (8) is autistic and would have been completely ignored in school but is now reading on grade level and amazes us with what he is learning. I have to tell you though, when we started homeschooling, my daughter hated math! I told her that we were going to take a year off of math and not do anything. She was so excited. Of course, we did a lot of cooking and money and percentages, etc. She had no idea she was learning anything. A few weeks ago she came begging to do some math. So we got Saxon 6/5 and she has been doing 2 lessons a day and absolutely loving it. It was such a great idea to delay the formal math. I never would have done that on my own without all of your articles and information in the book.

Well, thank you for all that you have done in mentoring younger women even if it is through the books and Internet. I have learned so much from your family and really appreciate your perspective. I think I have my brother and his wife convinced of the Teaching the Trivium way as well.

God bless you,
Melissa

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Free Art Curriculum Ebook for These Five Days

April 7th, 2015

template art curriculum cover volume one

Trivium Pursuit’s newest curriculum is now available — What Do You See? A Child’s First Introduction to Art, Volume 1 [Kindle Edition] by Laurie Bluedorn.

This 36-page ebook can be purchased on Amazon for $2.99, but from April 14-18 you can download the ebook for free, plus receive another Trivium Pursuit ebook. Details below.

What Do You See? A Child’s First Introduction to Art is a gentle and easy introduction to art appreciation for children, ages 4-12. Our goal is to introduce children to basic concepts in learning how to look at a piece of art and evaluate it. In addition, we want to spark in the child a love for the great works of art.

Here are five benefits for your students when they appreciate art:

1. It will stimulate them to ask questions.
2. It will cause them to try to understand why the artist painted what he did.
3. It will push them to pay attention to details the artist placed inside his painting.
4. It will make them curious and perhaps try to paint something themselves.
5. It will stimulate them to research the life of the artist and the history of the painting.

The students and teacher should spend a bit of time observing the painting, and then answer the questions. Since one of our goals is to learn to love art, we recommend that you ask the child to answer the questions orally, not with pencil and paper. We want to make the learning experience enjoyable for you and the children.

This first volume will introduce only one art principle — Center of Interest. A center of interest is the all-important part of a painting — that part of the picture where the artist wants you to look first and which attracts the mind. The center of interest often has the sharpest edges, the brightest colors, and the most detail. In addition, it often contains a color that doesn’t exist anywhere else on the painting. Keep in mind, though, not all paintings contain a center of interest, plus, unless the artist has told us what he intended his center of interest to be, there could be differences of opinion as to a painting’s center of interest.

Table of Contents for Volume 1

1. Little Red Riding Hood and Grandmother by Harriet Backer
2. The Dog Cart by Henriëtte Ronner-Knip
3. The Birthday Cake by Victor Gabriel Gilbert
4. Boy with Baby Carriage by Norman Rockwell
5. Feeding the Baby by Axel Theophilus Helsted
6. Elsie Cassatt Holding a Big Dog by Mary Cassatt
7. Carnation, Lily, Lily, Rose by John Singer Sargent
8. Cottage Girl with Dog and Pitcher by Thomas Gainsborough
9. A Child’s Menagerie by Eastman Johnson
10. Belshazzar’s Feast by Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn
11. Suggested Answers to Questions

Harvey and Laurie Bluedorn started homeschooling their children in 1980 and have given workshops on homeschooling and classical education for support groups and at conventions across the country. Their publishing company Trivium Pursuit produces books and curricula to help parents use classical education in their homeschool. The Bluedorns live in New Boston, Illinois, and can be reached by visiting their web site.

Sign up for the Homeschooling with the Trivium e-letter.

Here is the special offer we have for you:

On April 14-18 (these five days only) the new ebook will be free. In addition, if you download the ebook sometime during the five day period and write an Amazon review, we’ll send you one of the ebooks from our Trivium Pursuit catalog (in PDF format). You can choose one ebook from the following:

Vocabulary Bridges from English to Latin & Greek by Harvey Bluedorn

A Review of English Grammar for Students of Biblical Greek and Other Ancient Languages by Harvey Bluedorn

Cómo Enseñar el Trivium — Educación Cristiana en Casa en un Estilo Clásico by Harvey and Laurie Bluedorn

Ancient Literature — Significant Excerpts From the Books of Classical Authors Which You Can Use to Supplement Your History Curriculum — Volume One: Julius Caesar

Ancient Literature — Significant Excerpts From the Books of Classical Authors Which You Can Use to Supplement Your History Curriculum — Volume Two: Alexander the Great

Ancient Literature — Significant Excerpts From the Books of Classical Authors Which You Can Use to Supplement Your History Curriculum — Volume Three: Augustus, Jesus Christ, and Tiberius

Ancient Literature — Significant Excerpts From the Books of Classical Authors Which You Can Use to Supplement Your History Curriculum — Volume Four: Ancient Egypt

Ancient Literature — Significant Excerpts From the Books of Classical Authors Which You Can Use to Supplement Your History Curriculum — Volume Five: Caligula, Claudius, and Paul

Ancient Literature — Significant Excerpts from the Books of Classical Authors Which You Can Use to Supplement Your History Curriculum — Volume Six: Nero, Paul, and the Destruction of Jerusalem

Westminster and Her Sisters: A Complete Collation and Comparison of Three English Confessions of Faith by Harvey Bluedorn

Trivium Pursuit’s List of National Contests and Exams Open to Homeschoolers

After you download What Do You See? A Child’s First Introduction to Art, Volume 1 and post your review, then email us (bluedorn @ triviumpursuit.com) with the name you wrote your review under and tell us which of the above ebooks you would like.

 

Lord, end my winter, and let my spring begin

April 6th, 2015

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C.H. Spurgeon Morning and Evening

Canst thou bind the sweet influences of Pleiades, or loose the bands of Orion? –Job 38:31

If inclined to boast of our abilities, the grandeur of nature may soon show us how puny we are. We cannot move the least of all the twinkling stars, or quench so much as one of the beams of the morning. We speak of power, but the heavens laugh us to scorn. When the Pleiades shine forth in spring with vernal joy we cannot restrain their influences, and when Orion reigns aloft, and the year is bound in winter’s fetters, we cannot relax the icy bands. The seasons revolve according to the divine appointment, neither can the whole race of men effect a change therein. Lord, what is man?

In the spiritual, as in the natural world, man’s power is limited on all hands. When the Holy Spirit sheds abroad His delights in the soul, none can disturb; all the cunning and malice of men are ineffectual to stay the genial quickening power of the Comforter. When He deigns to visit a church and revive it, the most inveterate enemies cannot resist the good work; they may ridicule it, but they can no more restrain it than they can push back the spring when the Pleiades rule the hour. God wills it, and so it must be. On the other hand, if the Lord in sovereignty, or in justice, bind up a man so that he is in soul bondage, who can give him liberty? He alone can remove the winter of spiritual death from an individual or a people. He looses the bands of Orion, and none but He. What a blessing it is that He can do it. O that He would perform the wonder to-night. Lord, end my winter, and let my spring begin. I cannot with all my longings raise my soul out of her death and dulness, but all things are possible with Thee. I need celestial influences, the clear shinings of Thy love, the beams of Thy grace, the light of Thy countenance, these are the Pleiades to me. I suffer much from sin and temptation, these are my wintry signs, my terrible Orion. Lord, work wonders in me, and for me. Amen.

 

New Art Curriculum from Trivium Pursuit

April 5th, 2015

template art curriculum cover volume one

Trivium Pursuit’s newest curriculum is now available — What Do You See? A Child’s First Introduction to Art, Volume 1 [Kindle Edition] by Laurie Bluedorn.

This 36-page ebook can be purchased on Amazon for $2.99, but from April 14-18 you can download the ebook for free, plus receive another Trivium Pursuit ebook. Details coming soon.

What Do You See? A Child’s First Introduction to Art is a gentle and easy introduction to art appreciation for children, ages 4-12. Our goal is to introduce children to basic concepts in learning how to look at a piece of art and evaluate it. In addition, we want to spark in the child a love for the great works of art.

Here are five benefits for your students when they appreciate art:

1. It will stimulate them to ask questions.
2. It will cause them to try to understand why the artist painted what he did.
3. It will push them to pay attention to details the artist placed inside his painting.
4. It will make them curious and perhaps try to paint something themselves.
5. It will stimulate them to research the life of the artist and the history of the painting.

The students and teacher should spend a bit of time observing the painting, and then answer the questions. Since one of our goals is to learn to love art, we recommend that you ask the child to answer the questions orally, not with pencil and paper. We want to make the learning experience enjoyable for you and the children.

This first volume will introduce only one art principle — Center of Interest. A center of interest is the all-important part of a painting — that part of the picture where the artist wants you to look first and which attracts the mind. The center of interest often has the sharpest edges, the brightest colors, and the most detail. In addition, it often contains a color that doesn’t exist anywhere else on the painting. Keep in mind, though, not all paintings contain a center of interest, plus, unless the artist has told us what he intended his center of interest to be, there could be differences of opinion as to a painting’s center of interest.

Table of Contents for Volume 1

1. Little Red Riding Hood and Grandmother by Harriet Backer
2. The Dog Cart by Henriëtte Ronner-Knip
3. The Birthday Cake by Victor Gabriel Gilbert
4. Boy with Baby Carriage by Norman Rockwell
5. Feeding the Baby by Axel Theophilus Helsted
6. Elsie Cassatt Holding a Big Dog by Mary Cassatt
7. Carnation, Lily, Lily, Rose by John Singer Sargent
8. Cottage Girl with Dog and Pitcher by Thomas Gainsborough
9. A Child’s Menagerie by Eastman Johnson
10. Belshazzar’s Feast by Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn
11. Suggested Answers to Questions

Harvey and Laurie Bluedorn started homeschooling their children in 1980 and have given workshops on homeschooling and classical education for support groups and at conventions across the country. Their publishing company Trivium Pursuit produces books and curricula to help parents use classical education in their homeschool. The Bluedorns live in New Boston, Illinois, and can be reached by visiting their web site.

Sign up for the Homeschooling with the Trivium e-letter.

 

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