Trivium Pursuit

Gentle and easy introduction to art appreciation for children

September 14th, 2016

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What Do You See? A Child’s First Introduction to Art — Volumes One, Two, and Three

Buy two volumes and get the third free.

A gentle and easy introduction to art appreciation for children, ages 4-12.

 

Ancient history excerpts — Remedies for head-ache and for wounds on the head

September 8th, 2016

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Pausanias (c. A.D. 143-176)
Description of Greece

2.28.1 The serpents of Corinth

The serpents, including a peculiar kind of a yellowish color, are considered sacred to Asclepius, and are tame with men. These are peculiar to Epidauria, and I have noticed that other lands have their peculiar animals. For in Libyaonly are to be found land crocodiles at least two cubits long; from India alone are brought, among other creatures, parrots. But the big snakes that grow to more than thirty cubits, such as are found in India and in Libya, are said by the Epidaurians not to be serpents, but some other kind of creature.

Pliny the Elder (c. A.D. 23-79)
Natural History

29.36 Remedies for head-ache and for wounds on the head

A good remedy for head-ache are the heads taken from the snails which are found without shells, and in an imperfect state. In these heads there is found a hard stony substance, about as large as a common pebble: on being extracted from the snail, it is attached to the patient, the smaller snails being pounded and applied to the forehead. Wool-grease, too, is used for a similar purpose; the bones of a vulture’s head, worn as an amulet; or the brains of that bird, mixed with oil and cedar resin, and applied to the head and introduced into the nostrils. The brains of a crow or owlet, are boiled and taken with the food: or a cock is put into a coop, and kept without food a day and a night, the patient submitting to a similar abstinence, and attaching to his head some feathers plucked from the neck or the comb of the fowl. The ashes, too, of a weasel are applied in the form of a liniment; a twig is taken from a kite’s nest, and laid beneath the patient’s pillow; or a mouse’s skin is burnt, and the ashes applied with vinegar: sometimes, also, the small bone is extracted from the head of a snail that has been found between two cart ruts, and after being passed through a gold ring, with a piece of ivory, is attached to the patient in a piece of dog’s skin; a remedy well known to most persons, and always used with success.

For fractures of the cranium, cobwebs are applied, with oil and vinegar; the application never coming away till a cure has been effected. Cobwebs are good, too, for stopping the bleeding of wounds made in shaving. Discharges of blood from the brain are arrested by applying the blood of a goose or duck, or the grease of those birds with oil of roses. The head of a snail cut off with a reed, while feeding in the morning, at full moon more particularly, is attached to the head in a linen cloth, with an old thrum, for the cure of headache; or else a liniment is made of it, and applied with white wax to the forehead. Dogs’ hairs are worn also, attached to the forehead in a cloth.

Pliny the Younger (c. A.D. 62-113)
Letters

9.6 Pliny complains about how grown men enjoy the chariot races

I have spent these several days past, in reading and writing, with the most pleasing tranquillity imaginable. You will ask, “How that can possibly be in the midst of Rome?” It was the time of celebrating the Circensian games: an entertainment for which I have not the least taste. They have no novelty, no variety to recommend them, nothing, in short, one would wish to see twice. It does the more surprise me therefore that so many thousand people should be possessed with the childish passion of desiring so often to see a parcel of horses gallop, and men standing upright in their chariots. If, indeed, it were the swiftness of the horses, or the skill of the men that attracted them, there might be some pretence of reason for it. But it is the dress1 they like; it is the dress that takes their fancy. And if, in the midst of the course and contest, the different parties were to change colours, their different partisans would change sides, and instantly desert the very same men and horses whom just before they were eagerly following with their eyes, as far as they could see, and shouting out their names with all their might. Such mighty charms, such wondrous power reside in the colour of a paltry tunic! And this not only with the common crowd (more contemptible than the dress they espouse), but even with serious-thinking people. When I observe such men thus insatiably fond of so silly, so low, so uninteresting, so common an entertainment, I congratulate myself on my indifference to these pleasures: and am glad to employ the leisure of this season upon my books, which others throw away upon the most idle occupations. Farewell.

Read more interesting excerpts from ancient literature and download your free copy of Ancient Literature — Significant Excerpts From the Books of Classical Authors Volume One — Julius Caesar here.

 

A serpent of unprecedented length — interesting excerpts from Ancient Literature

September 8th, 2016

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Aulus Gellius (c. 125 – after 180 AD) — A Roman whose only book, Attic Nights, is a compilation of notes on grammar, geometry, philosophy, history and many other subjects.

Attic Nights
Book 7, Chapter 3

An account, taken from the works of Tubero, of a serpent of unprecedented length.

1  Tubero in his Histories has recorded that in the first Punic war the consul Atilius Regulus, when encamped at the Bagradas river in Africa, fought a stubborn and fierce battle with a single serpent of extraordinary size, which had its lair in that region; that in a mighty struggle with the entire army the reptile was attacked for a long time with hurling engines and catapults; and that when it was finally killed, its skin, a hundred and twenty feet long, was sent to Rome.

Attic Nights
Book 10, Chapter 8

That among the ignominious punishments which were inflicted upon soldiers was the letting of blood; and what seems to be the reason for such a penalty.

1  This also was a military punishment in old times, to disgrace a soldier by ordering a vein to be opened, and letting blood. 2 There is no reason assigned for this in the old records, so far as I could find; but I infer that it was first done to soldiers whose minds were affected and who were not in a normal condition, so that it appears to have been not so much a punishment as a medical treatment. 3 But afterwards I suppose that the same penalty was customarily inflicted for many other offenses, on the ground that all who sinned were not of sound mind.

Pliny the Elder (23-79 AD) was a Roman author, naturalist, natural philosopher, and naval and army commander of the early Roman Empire. His work Natural History is considered the first encyclopedia.

Natural History 9.8

…In the days of Augustus Cæsar the Emperor, there was a dolphin entered the gulf or pool Lucrinus. This dolphin loved wondrous well a certain boy, a poor man’s son who went every day to school from Baianum to Puteoli. This boy was wont also about noon tide to stay at the water side and to call unto the dolphin, Simo, Simo, and many times would give him fragments of bread, which of purpose he ever brought with him, and by this mean allured the dolphin to come ordinarily unto him at his call. I would make scruple and bash to insert this tale in my story and to tell it out, but that Mecænas Fabianus, Flavius Alfius, and many others have set it down for a truth in their Chronicles. Well, in process of time, at what hour soever of the day, this boy lured for him and called Simo, were the dolphin never so close hidden in any secret and blind corner, out he would and come abroad, yea and come up to this lad, and taking bread and other victuals at his hand, would gently offer him his back to mount upon, and then down went the sharp pointed prick of his fins, which he would put up as it were within a sheath for fear of hurting the boy. Thus when he had him once on his back, he would carry him over the broad arm of the sea as far as Puteoli to school, and in like manner convey him back again home, and thus he continued for many years together, so long as the child lived. But when the boy was fallen sick and dead, yet the dolphin gave not over his haunt, but usually came to the wanted place, and missing the lad, seemed to be heavy and mourn again, until for very grief and sorrow (as it is doubtless to be presumed) he also was found dead upon the shore.

Read more interesting excerpts from ancient literature and download your free copy of Ancient Literature — Significant Excerpts From the Books of Classical Authors Volume One — Julius Caesar here.

 

Gardening in 2016

September 4th, 2016

Thank you, Lord, for flowers.

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Use primary sources to enhance your study of ancient history — Volume One Free for 3 Days

September 2nd, 2016

Are you looking for a way to include primary sources into your history lessons?

Ancient History Primary Sources Julius Caesar Cover

Ancient Literature — Significant Excerpts From the Books of Classical Authors Which You Can Use to Supplement Your History Curriculum

Volume One — Julius Caesar
Volume Two — Alexander the Great
Volume Three — Augustus, Jesus Christ, and Tiberius
Volume Four — Ancient Egypt
Volume Five — Caligula, Claudius, and Paul
Volume Six — Nero, Paul, and the Destruction of Jerusalem

These six ebooks (over 800 pages) can be purchased on Amazon Kindle for $2.99 each….

….but, for three days (September 7-9), Volume One Julius Caesar is free.

Use primary sources to enhance your study of history.

These ebooks can be used to supplement any ancient history curriculum and are suitable for ages ten through adult. For these volumes, we combed through the books of dozens of ancient authors to find significant excerpts concerning the different time periods. We then arranged the excerpts chronologically and provided the text and citation for each.

Download your free copy of Volume One — Julius Caesar here.

Buy Volume Two — Alexander the Great here.

Buy Volume Three — Augustus, Jesus Christ, and Tiberius here.

Buy Volume Four — Ancient Egypt here.

Buy Volume Five — Caligula, Claudius, and Paul here.

Buy Volume Six — Nero, Paul, and the Destruction of Jerusalem here.

You can purchase the PDF version of these ebooks here.

 

The Trivium and Charlotte Mason

August 16th, 2016

Are the Classical Approach and the Charlotte Mason Approach two homeschool approaches so opposite from each other that they cannot be reconciled? Or is it possible to use a combination of these two approaches? Let’s look at each of these approaches separately and see what are the similarities and differences. ….

Read the rest of the article here.

by Laurie Bluedorn (1999)

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Infinite wisdom directs every event

August 16th, 2016

John Dagg, 1857

The Lord does whatever pleases Him in the heavens and on the earth, in the seas and all their depths. Psalm 135:5-6

It should fill us with joy that God’s infinite wisdom guides the affairs of the world.

Many of its events are shrouded in darkness and mystery, and inextricable confusion sometimes seems to reign.

Often wickedness prevails, and God seems to have forgotten the creatures that He has made.

Our own path through life is dark and devious, and beset with difficulties and dangers.

How full of consolation is the doctrine, that infinite wisdom directs every event, brings order out of confusion, and light out of darkness, and, to those who love God, His infinite wisdom causes all things, whatever their present aspect and apparent tendency is, to work together for good.

We know that God causes all things to work together for good to those who love God, to those who are called according to His purpose. Romans 8:28

 

Kindle Ebook Free for Three Days

August 16th, 2016

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Homeschool Basics: Christian Homeschooling in a Classical Style

FREE for 3 Days

This 43-page ebook is an excerpt from the book Teaching the Trivium: Christian Homeschooling in a Classical Style by Harvey and Laurie Bluedorn

The ebook lays out a suggested course of study and guidelines for teaching children below age ten.

You can purchase the ebook on Amazon for $1.99, but from August 17-19 you can download the ebook for free, plus receive another Trivium Pursuit ebook. See details below.

Teaching the Trivium: Christian Homeschooling in a Classical Style is not just about classical education — it gives a workable plan for every subject and for every age which avoids homeschool burnout.

Some of the distinctives of Teaching the Trivium include:

–an emphasis on reading aloud to your children
–studying logic from ages ten through high school, rather than using it as a one or two year supplement
–ancient literature from a Christian perspective
–why INFORMAL math or grammar before age ten may be a better choice
–how to give your children the tools they need to teach themselves
–how to continue using other approaches to homeschooling within the framework of classical education

Sign up for the Homeschooling with the Trivium newsletter — each newsletter contains freebies, book reviews, Homeschooling Q & A, read-aloud suggestions, tips on teaching Latin, Greek, and logic, and contests with book-giveaways.

Here is the special offer:

On August 17-19 (these three days only) the ebook will be free. In addition, if you download the ebook sometime during the three day period and write an Amazon review, we’ll send you one of the ebooks from the Trivium Pursuit catalog (in PDF format). You can choose one ebook from the following:

Vocabulary Bridges from English to Latin & Greek by Harvey Bluedorn

A Review of English Grammar for Students of Biblical Greek and Other Ancient Languages by Harvey Bluedorn

Cómo Enseñar el Trivium — Educación Cristiana en Casa en un Estilo Clásico by Harvey and Laurie Bluedorn

Ancient Literature — Significant Excerpts From the Books of Classical Authors Which You Can Use to Supplement Your History Curriculum — Volume One: Julius Caesar

Ancient Literature — Significant Excerpts From the Books of Classical Authors Which You Can Use to Supplement Your History Curriculum — Volume Two: Alexander the Great

Ancient Literature — Significant Excerpts From the Books of Classical Authors Which You Can Use to Supplement Your History Curriculum — Volume Three: Augustus, Jesus Christ, and Tiberius

Ancient Literature — Significant Excerpts From the Books of Classical Authors Which You Can Use to Supplement Your History Curriculum — Volume Four: Ancient Egypt

Ancient Literature — Significant Excerpts From the Books of Classical Authors Which You Can Use to Supplement Your History Curriculum — Volume Five: Caligula, Claudius, and Paul

Ancient Literature — Significant Excerpts from the Books of Classical Authors Which You Can Use to Supplement Your History Curriculum — Volume Six: Nero, Paul, and the Destruction of Jerusalem

Trivium Pursuit’s List of National Contests and Exams Open to Homeschoolers

What Do You See? A Child’s First Introduction to Art, Volume One by Laurie Bluedorn

HOW TO CLAIM YOUR FREE EBOOK FROM THE LIST ABOVE:

After you download Homeschool Basics: Christian Homeschooling in a Classical Style and post your review on Amazon, send an email to bluedorn@triviumpursuit.com with the name you wrote your review under and the title of the ebook you would like.

 

Why Study Logic?

August 9th, 2016

Why Study Logic? Perhaps the most important thing to give your child to prepare him to confront this world is a firm grasp of logical thinking skills. Without this refined skill — the ability to reason correctly — his thinking is not firmly anchored, but is “tossed to and fro, and carried about with every wind of doctrine.” Children who can logically understand what they believe will hold fast to the truth and will be able to defend it throughout their lives.

Logic is necessary to analyze other people’s beliefs. Logical fallacies are everywhere in our society. If your child cannot detect the logical mistakes he hears, then how will he discern who is right? The study of logical fallacies (common mistakes in reasoning) is important to critically reason through the arguments of others.

Logic is necessary to understand and communicate our own beliefs. The Scripture commands us to prove our doctrines and practices. (Ephesians 5:10) We are to reason and dispute from the Scriptures with persuasive and convincing arguments (Acts 17:2) If we are able to think through and clearly reason from the Bible, then we will be better equipped to give a proper defense of our faith. (I Peter 3:15)

Logic is necessary. The study of formal logic should be considered foundational to every educational curriculum. In the past it was. The roots of logic stretch into every other subject. The construction and programming of computers, for example, is based entirely upon the application of the laws of logic. The proofs of algebra and geometry rely upon the laws of logic. The laws of logic, in one way or another, are fundamental to every academic discipline.

Unfortunately, the study of logic is dispensed with in the modern curriculum. Social skills are considered more important than thinking skills. Children do not learn to think for themselves. The study of formal logic will give your child life-long skill in proper reasoning. The study of logic should be considered indispensable to every Classical Education.

Harvey Bluedorn

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Ancient history ebooks free with purchase from our catalog

August 9th, 2016

This week you can receive FREE (upon request) these ancient history ebooks with any purchase from our catalog.

Ancient Literature

Significant Excerpts From the Books of Classical Authors Which You Can Use to Supplement Your History Curriculum

All Six Ebooks for $25 — free this week with any purchase from our catalog

Published by Trivium Pursuit

Use primary sources to enhance your study of ancient history.

811 pages total

These ebooks can be used to supplement any ancient history curriculum and are suitable for ages ten through adult. For these volumes, we combed through the books of dozens of ancient authors to find numerous significant excerpts concerning the different time periods. We then arranged the excerpts chronologically and provided the text and citation for each.

Included in this package deal is Ancient Literature — Significant Excerpts From the Books of Classical Authors Which You Can Use to Supplement Your History Curriculum

Volume One: Julius Caesar
Volume Two: Alexander the Great
Volume Three: Augustus, Jesus Christ, and Tiberius
Volume Four: Ancient Egypt
Volume Five: Caligula, Claudius, and Paul
Volume Six: Nero, Paul, and the Destruction of Jerusalem.

After you place an order on our web site, email us with your request for the ebooks.

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