Trivium Pursuit

Essential Oils and Medical Studies

January 15th, 2019

For those of you who would like to study the medical value of essential oils, here are some links.


Also, here is a special offer you might want to look at.

Special giveaway this month.

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1). A Dewdrop Diffuser
2). 2 bottles of NingXia Red
3). 3 bottles of oil from my private stash!

Here are three simple ways you can qualify to win. Some restrictions apply:

1). First, you must be a Young Living member. To do this, sign up with any Premium Starter Kit by midnight on January 31st, by going here and following the directions. Keep in mind, as a member, you automatically enjoy a 24% wholesale discount.

If you’re already a member on my team, help a friend become a member with a Premium Starter Kit. This way, you’d both qualify for the giveaway. The more people you help, the more chances you’ll have to win, plus you can earn some extra cash by our generous compensation plan.

2). Use your Premium Starter Kit purchase as your first Essential Rewards order. If you’ve already become a member of our team and aren’t enjoying the benefits of Essential Rewards, sign up this month to qualify for the giveaway.

If you’re already enjoying Essential Rewards, you must place a minimum 300PV order (or Quick Order) from today’s date through January 31st. Combined orders will not qualify.

3). Schedule and host either an in-person class (locally) or an online class with me within the month of January. Dates are limited. First come, first serve.

Restrictions: Each qualifying action *must be* reported to Tanya Leontiev Duarte via email directly from the qualifying person. That person’s name will then be placed into a drawing. There will only be three winners. Drawing will take place February 2nd & winners announced that morning.


Roman Chamomile and migraines

Migraine is a chronic recurring headache for which no complete treatment has been found yet. Therefore, finding new treatment approaches and medicines is important. In this review, we consider the probable mechanism of action of a traditional and ethnic formulary of chamomile extract in sesame oil as a new topical medication for migraine pain relief.

Infection control

Lemongrass oil proved to be particularly active against gram-positive bacteria, while Tea Tree oil showed superior inhibition of gram-negative microorganisms. As proven in vitro, plant-derived antiseptic oils may represent a promising and affordable topical agent to support surgical treatment against multi-resistant and hospital-acquired infections.

IBS and peppermint

The aim of the study was to test the effectiveness of enteric-coated peppermint oil in patients with irritable bowel syndrome in whom small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, lactose intolerance and celiac disease were excluded.

Anti-bacterial properties of essential oils

Cinnamon oil showed highest activity against Streptococcus mutans followed by lemongrass oil and cedarwood oil. Wintergreen oil, lime oil, peppermint oil and spearmint oil showed no antibacterial activity.

Myrtle Oil and inflammation

It can be concluded that the essential oil of Myrtus communis reduces leukocyte migration to the damaged tissue and exhibits antiinflammatory activity.

Myrtle Oil and oral infections

M. communis essential oil with the minimum inhibitory concentration in the range of 0.032-32 μg/mL was an effective antimicrobial agent against persistent endodontic microorganisms.

Neroli Oil as an anti-inflammatory

The results suggest that neroli possesses biologically active constituent(s) that have significant activity against acute and especially chronic inflammation, and have central and peripheral antinociceptive effects which support the ethnomedicinal claims of the use of the plant in the management of pain and inflammation.

Frankincense and inflammation

The aim of this study was to assess the anti-inflammatory efficacy of Boswellia frereana extracts in an in vitro model of cartilage degeneration and determine its potential as a therapy for treating osteoarthritis.

An Herbal Legend: Investigating the Efficacy and Safety of Lavender Oil in the Treatment of Various Health Conditions

Lavender is an herb that has been used in many treatment applications. Lavender is distilled into an oil which can then be used topically, orally, or by inhalation. This paper extends upon the use of lavender in various health issues.

 

Paul’s three-word description of what sin does to all people

January 15th, 2019

Taken from Come, Let Us Adore Him: A Daily Advent Devotional by Paul David Tripp, 2017, pp. 82-82.

People will be lovers of themselves. 2 Timothy 3:2

It’s the inescapable, destructive commitment of every person that was ever born. It marches down a pathway of separation from God and our ultimate doom. None of us successfully avoid it. We see it in others and it bothers us, but somehow we are blind to it in ourselves. It shapes what we think, desire, say, and do. It shapes our unwritten law for the people we live with and a host of unrealistic expectations for the situations we live in. It explains why we are so often irritated and impatient. It describes why some of us are perennially unhappy and some of us trudge through life depressed. It causes us to want what we will never, ever have and to demand what we do not deserve. It puts us at odds with one another and in endless fights with God. It is one of the deep diseases of our sin nature and a core reason for the birth of Jesus.

Paul says that Jesus came so “that those who live might no longer live for themselves” (2 Corinthians 5:14–15). Consider Paul’s three-word description of what sin does to all people: “live for themselves.” That’s what we all do from the first moment of our lives. We all demand to be in the center of our world. We all tend to be too focused on what we want, on what we think we need, and on our feelings. We all want our own way, and we want people to stay out of our way. We all want to be sovereign over our lives and to write our own rules. We demand to be served, indulged, agreed with, accepted, and respected. In our self-centeredness, we convince ourselves that our wants are our needs, and when we do, we judge the love of God and others by their willingness to deliver them. When we are angry, it’s seldom because the people around us have broken God’s law; most often we are angry because people have broken the law of our happiness. Because we live for our happiness, happiness always eludes us — because every fulfilled desire is followed by yet another desire.

 

Five In a Row this week — Madeline

January 13th, 2019

Madeline by Ludwig Bemelmans is one of the book selections in the Five In a Row homeschool curriculum and was last week’s choice for Daughter Johannah’s family.

Here are a few of the projects they chose to go along with Madeline:

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Eric reading to Michael

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Eric and Michael making French flags

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Eric cooking French toast

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Michael’s Arc de Triomphe

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Ian’s Arc de Triomphe

 

Here are some words to permeate your vocabulary in the new year without seeming pretentious

January 13th, 2019

veracity

• aberration = deviation, a departure from what is normal or desirable
• à la carte = separately priced, with each dish on a menu priced separately
• apathetic = not taking any interest in anything, or not bothering to do anything
• apprise = to inform or give notice to somebody about something
• ballyhoo = NOUN sensational, loud, or sustained advertising; VERB to advertise or publicize something loudly and insistently
• canard = a hoax, a deliberately false report or rumor, especially something silly intended as a joke
• conundrum = an intricate and difficult problem; something that is puzzling or confusing; a riddle, especially one with an answer in the form of a play on words
• curate = NOUN a priest’s assistant, member of the Christian clergy who assists a vicar, rector, or priest; VERB transitive and intransitive verb: to be the curator of a museum, gallery, or other collection; transitive verb to organize and choose the items in an exhibition at a museum or gallery
• deign = VERB to do something in a way that shows that it is considered a great favor; to do something in a haughty manner
• détente = a relaxation of tension or hostility between nations
• dispositive = deciding or bringing about the final outcome or settlement of a court case
• exacerbate = to make an already bad or problematic situation worse
• fait accompli = something that is already done or decided and seems unalterable
• feint = a deceptive action made to disguise what is really intended
• furtive = secretive, done in a way that is intended to escape notice; shifty, presenting the appearance, or giving the impression, of somebody who has something to hide
• garrulous = excessively or pointlessly talkative; wordy, using many or too many words
• haute couture = the creation of exclusive custom-fitted clothing; the design and production of fashionable high-quality custom-made clothes
• hegemony = control or dominating influence by one person or group, especially by one political group over society or one nation over others
• heuristic = ADJECTIVE (education) relating to or using a method of teaching that encourages learners to discover solutions for themselves; (philosophy science) using or arrived at by a process of trial and error rather than set rules; NOUN a helpful procedure for arriving at a solution but not necessarily a proof
• hoplite = in ancient Greece, a heavily armed foot soldier
• insouciant = free from concern, worry, or anxiety; carefree; nonchalant
• internecine = relating to or involving conflict within a group or organization; mutually destructive, damaging or injuring participants on both sides of a conflict
• nascent = in the process of emerging, being born, or starting to develop
• obelus [/obelisk] = a printed mark (†) used in modern editions of ancient manuscripts to indicate that the passage marked is thought not to be genuine; a dagger sign (†) that is used as a reference mark, especially to a footnote
• obsequious = excessively eager to please or obey
• outrage = an extremely violent or cruel act; a very offensive or insulting act; fury, intense anger and indignation aroused by a violent or offensive act
• perambulate = to walk about
• permeate = to enter something and spread throughout it, so that every part or aspect of it is affected; to pass through the minute openings in a porous substance or membrane, or make something such as a liquid pass through
• pretentious = self-important, acting as though more important or special than is warranted, or appearing to have an unrealistically high self-image; made to look important, intended to seem to have a special quality or significance, but often seeming forced or overly clever; ostentatious, extravagantly and consciously showy or glamorous
• proclivity = a natural tendency to behave in a particular way
• quid pro quo = something given or done in exchange for something else
• rapprochement = the establishment or renewal of friendly relations between people or nations that were previously hostile or unsympathetic toward each other
• recidivism = the tendency to relapse into a previous undesirable type of behavior, especially crime
• reprisal = a violent military action, e.g. the killing of prisoners or civilians, carried out in retaliation for an enemy’s action; a strong or violent retaliation for an action that somebody has taken; the forcible seizure of property or people from another country as retaliation for some injury
• surreptitious = done in a concealed or underhand way to escape notice, especially disapproval
• tendentious = written or spoken with personal bias in order to promote a cause or support a viewpoint, trying to influence opinion
• tumult = a violent or noisy commotion; a psychological or emotional upheaval or agitation
• ubiquitous = present everywhere at once, or seeming to be
• veracity = the truth, accuracy, or precision of something

 

Starting over at 50 — where should I begin?

January 13th, 2019

I’ve been impressed with your website and materials. Sadly, all my children are grown and gone and didn’t get the education they should have. I’m realizing I was not able to educate them well because I am not a logical person. Over the last year I have worked at it but have only made a little headway. I am 50 and would really like to learn more. Pre-logic is where I need to start. Also, it seems obvious that I am poor in math. I know the basics of math but get lost quickly after that. Would you have some suggestions for me? Thank you, Lora B.

Here are three suggestions:

1. Here is a good pre-logic course — The Fallacy Detective: Thirty-Eight Lessons on How to Recognize Bad Reasoning — after this book you can follow this course of study for logic.

2. Write one paragraph a day, on any subject you want. If you would like something more organized, purchase a writing curriculum geared for adults. Set up a reading program for yourself. There are many different opinions on what a good reading list looks like. But, better yet, subscribe to the Ron Paul Homeschool Curriculum and take their English/history/literature courses. I think this would be particularly useful to you as it would be your reading, writing, and history combined.

RON-PAUL-CURRICULUM

3. Determine where you would be in math (maybe 8th or 9th grade) and
get a textbook. Most math curriculum have placement tests so you can determine which level you would be in.

 

New edition of Archer and Zowie by Hans Bluedorn just released

January 11th, 2019

New edition of Archer and Zowie by Hans Bluedorn just released.

A sci-fi adventure for kids, written by an author of The Fallacy Detective: Thirty-Eight Lessons on How to Recognize Bad Reasoning.

Use your imagination to travel into space with an evil microwave and learn the importance of Trash Day.

This is a small, but feisty, story about Archer and Zowie: two friends who build a space ship on purpose but crash land on an alien planet by accident. Then, get into a big argument about it.

It is also about the Teleportee. A device so strange it can chew on the whole universe in one googlebillionth of a second.

In this book Archer and Zowie will battle dark matter, babysitters, teleporting microwave ovens, big penguin aliens, and even the author of this book to come out on the other side…..very dirty.

Archer and Zowie is now at Marias Bookshop downtown Durango, Colorado.

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Jaden and Gianna enjoying their copy of Archer and Zowie

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Free art curriculum (and more) with your purchase from the Trivium Pursuit catalog

January 11th, 2019

This week, with any purchase from the Trivium Pursuit catalog (excluding ebooks), you will receive (upon request) the following ebooks:

1. A Review of English Grammar for Students of Biblical Greek and Other Ancient Languages: A Thorough Self-Study Program For Ages Twelve Through Adult by Harvey Bluedorn

2. Ancient Literature — Significant Excerpts from the Books of Classical Authors Which You Can Use to Supplement Your History Curriculum — Volume One: Julius Caesar

3. Ancient Literature — Significant Excerpts from the Books of Classical Authors Which You Can Use to Supplement Your History Curriculum — Volume Two: Alexander the Great

4. Ancient Literature — Significant Excerpts from the Books of Classical Authors Which You Can Use to Supplement Your History Curriculum — Volume Three: Augustus, Jesus Christ, and Tiberius

5. Ancient Literature — Significant Excerpts from the Books of Classical Authors Which You Can Use to Supplement Your History Curriculum — Volume Four: Ancient Egypt

6. Ancient Literature — Significant Excerpts from the Books of Classical Authors Which You Can Use to Supplement Your History Curriculum — Volume Five: Caligula, Claudius, and Paul

7. Ancient Literature — Significant Excerpts from the Books of Classical Authors Which You Can Use to Supplement Your History Curriculum — Volume Six: Nero, Paul, and the Destruction of Jerusalem

8. What Do You See? A Child’s First Introduction to Art, Volume One

9. What Do You See? A Child’s First Introduction to Art, Volume Two

10. What Do You See? A Child’s First Introduction to Art, Volume Three

All 3 covers of art curr

 

God would have his servants dressed in the livery of joy

January 11th, 2019

Morning And Evening by C.H. Spurgeon

January 9 Evening

Serve the Lord with gladness. –Psalm 100:2

Delight in divine service is a token of acceptance. Those who serve God with a sad countenance, because they do what is unpleasant to them, are not serving him at all; they bring the form of homage, but the life is absent. Our God requires no slaves to grace his throne; he is the Lord of the empire of love, and would have his servants dressed in the livery of joy. The angels of God serve him with songs, not with groans; a murmur or a sigh would be a mutiny in their ranks. That obedience which is not voluntary is disobedience, for the Lord looks at the heart, and if he sees that we serve him from force, and not because we love him, he will reject our offering. Service coupled with cheerfulness is heart-service, and therefore true. Take away joyful willingness from the Christian, and you have removed the test of his sincerity. If a man be driven to battle, he is no patriot; but he who marches into the fray with flashing eye and beaming face, singing, It is sweet for one’s country to die, proves himself to be sincere in his patriotism. Cheerfulness is the support of our strength; in the joy of the Lord are we strong. It acts as the remover of difficulties. It is to our service what oil is to the wheels of a railway carriage. Without oil the axle soon grows hot, and accidents occur; and if there be not a holy cheerfulness to oil our wheels, our spirits will be clogged with weariness. The man who is cheerful in his service of God, proves that obedience is his element; he can sing,

Make me to walk in thy commands,
‘Tis a delightful road.

Reader, let us put this question — do you serve the Lord with gladness? Let us show to the people of the world, who think our religion to be slavery, that it is to us a delight and a joy! Let our gladness proclaim that we serve a good Master.

 

Using a Microscope in Your Homeschool

January 4th, 2019

I bought this microscope many years ago when my kids were working through Exploring Creation with Biology by Dr. Jay L. Wile. It was the first year of publication for the biology course, and we received each chapter as it was written.

I purchased the microscope from a company which refurbished used university microscopes and it was love at first sight. At one point in the curriculum we were introduced to protozoa. The kids went on to finish the book, but I stayed with protozoa and the microscope.

I suggest that you study how to buy a microscope before purchasing one. There are lots of variables. Binocular microscopes (two eyepieces) are best, in my opinion, as there is less frustration with viewing the slides.

Here is a microscope you might want to consider for your homeschooled student:

OMAX 40X-2000X Lab LED Binocular Microscope with Double Layer Mechanical Stage w Blank Slides Covers and Lens Cleaning Paper

We bought our specimens from Carolina Biological Supply.

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Collect things to look at under the microscope — hair samples from members of the family

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Collect samples from nature

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Little brother needs to be distracted

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Does it need cleaning?

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My turn, Grammy!

 

14 free ebooks with Trivium Pursuit order

January 4th, 2019

This week, with any purchase from the Trivium Pursuit catalog (excluding ebooks), you will receive (upon request) the following ebooks:

1. A Review of English Grammar for Students of Biblical Greek and Other Ancient Languages: A Thorough Self-Study Program For Ages Twelve Through Adult by Harvey Bluedorn

2. Ancient Literature — Significant Excerpts from the Books of Classical Authors Which You Can Use to Supplement Your History Curriculum — Volume One: Julius Caesar

3. Ancient Literature — Significant Excerpts from the Books of Classical Authors Which You Can Use to Supplement Your History Curriculum — Volume Two: Alexander the Great

4. Ancient Literature — Significant Excerpts from the Books of Classical Authors Which You Can Use to Supplement Your History Curriculum — Volume Three: Augustus, Jesus Christ, and Tiberius

5. Ancient Literature — Significant Excerpts from the Books of Classical Authors Which You Can Use to Supplement Your History Curriculum — Volume Four: Ancient Egypt

6. Ancient Literature — Significant Excerpts from the Books of Classical Authors Which You Can Use to Supplement Your History Curriculum — Volume Five: Caligula, Claudius, and Paul

7. Ancient Literature — Significant Excerpts from the Books of Classical Authors Which You Can Use to Supplement Your History Curriculum — Volume Six: Nero, Paul, and the Destruction of Jerusalem

8. Illustrated Bible Excerpts: David & Goliath

9. Illustrated Bible Excerpts: The Book of Daniel in Chronological Order with Dates

10. Illustrated Bible Excerpts: The Book of Esther

11. What Do You See? A Child’s First Introduction to Art, Volume One

12. What Do You See? A Child’s First Introduction to Art, Volume Two

13. What Do You See? A Child’s First Introduction to Art, Volume Three

14. Lives in Print: Biographies and Autobiographies for All Ages

 

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